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  1. Fedorov Anglo by T-26 25.00 USD
    Fedorov Anglo was designed by Jim Marcus and published by T-26. Fedorov Anglo contains 1 style.


  2. Rice Wine JNL by Jeff Levine 29.00 USD
    A piece of sheet music from Richard Rodgers and Oscar Hammerstein II's 1958 hit "Flower Drum Song" had the play's name lettered in its iconic Anglo-Japanese style.

  3. P22 Yule by IHOF 24.95 USD
    P22 Yule is a series of display fonts inspired by a mélange of ancient inscriptional writing, with visual references to Anglo-Saxon, Celtic, medieval and even a bit of ancient Greek and roman letterforms.

  4. Angler NF by Nick's Fonts 10.00 USD
    The 1895 specimen book from Barnhart Brothers and Spindler featured this whimsical typeface, originally called Anglo. An unusual combination of elegance and quirky charm. Both versions of this font support the Latin 1252, Central European 1250, Turkish 1254 and Baltic 1257 codepages.

  5. Begum by Indian Type Foundry 39.00 USD
    Begum is a Latin display serif typeface with contrast. With an ultra-contemporary appearance, its characters share DNA with classic Anglo-Dutch types like Caslon, Fleischmann or Times. The family shines in shorter-length texts, multi-line article introductions, and even on packaging. Begum is part of a larger family that supports also Devanagari and Tamil scripts.

  6. Austin Pen by Three Islands Press 29.00 USD
    Empresario Stephen F. Austin (1793-1836) is considered by many the “Father of Texas” for leading the first Anglo-American colony into the then-Mexican territory back in the 1820s. A few years later, while on a diplomatic mission to Mexico City, Austin was arrested on suspicion of plotting Texas independence and imprisoned for virtually all of 1834. During this time he kept a secret diary of his thoughts and musings—much of it written in Spanish.

  7. MFC Chaoxiang Monogram by Monogram Fonts Co. 19.95 USD
    The inspiration source for Chaoxiang Monogram is another hand-drawn treasure from a vintage embroidery publication which plays on the anglo-version of chinese letters with stabbing strokes and the charm of the orient. While the original intent of this monogram style is uncertain, the possibilities of its use are up to your imagination. This is one of many monogram designs from the early 1900’s which fall into a two letter format bound within a framing element.

  8. Southwark by Hanoded 15.00 USD
    London is one of my favourite cities, so it was about time I named a font after it. Well, technically, I named a font after one of London’s districts. Southwark comes from the Anglo-Saxon word Suthriganaweorc, which means ‘Fort of the men of Surrey’. The font Southwork is a handmade Clarendon. I used a Japanese brush pen to create the outlines. I gave the glyphs texture by filling them in with a brush and Chinese ink. Southwark, therefore, has an uneven look and a brushy texture. It looks good on just about anything, but posters, greeting cards and product packaging come to mind.

  9. Gundrada ML by HiH 12.00 USD
    Gundrada ML was inspired by the lettering on the tomb of Gundrada de Warenne. She was buried at Southover Church at Lewes, Sussex, in the south of England in 1085. The Latin inscription on her tomb, STIRPS GUNDRADA DUCUM, meaning “Gundrada, descendant of the Duke” may have led to the speculation that she was the daughter of William, Duke of Normandy and bastard son of Robert the Devil of Normandy and Arletta, daughter of a tanner in Falaise. In 1066 William defeated Harold at the Battle of Hastings and was crowned William I of England. More commonly known as William the Conquerer, he commissioned a string of forts around the kingdom and charged trusted Norman Barons to control the contentious Anglo-Saxon population. William de Warenne, husband of Gundrada, was one of these Barons.

  10. LeDrôle Lettering Pro by Ingo 40.00 USD
    The Comic-Script by ingoFontsIn the past cartoons used to be lettered by hand. Hardly anyone does this today. The reason is, because hardly anyone has nice handwriting these days, so there are practical advantages in having a special font. However the font should still look like it’s been written by hand. Well, most script fonts don’t meet this requirement.The LeDrôle Lettering is a computer font, but closely resembles genuine handwriting.The model for the LeDrôle Lettering is my personal handwriting, as can be seen on the example of the Biró Script, which is also an ingoFont.The habit of capitalization comes from the Romanic and Anglo-Saxon countries. Depending on the purpose they are designed in three significantly bolder weights.In order for the typeface to actually look handwritten, it needs to have clearly visible irregularities. These are not found only in the shapes of the individual letters. Even though LeDrôle Lettering is all in capital letters, the characters of uppercase and lowercase letters are clearly different. Additionally, many alternative shapes are used, which are automatically applied when the OpenType “Ligatures” feature is activated. Thus, there are no identical double letters or numerals, and many character combinations are defined as ligatures with alternative forms.

  11. Biro Script Plus by Ingo 50.00 USD
    An authentic script from the tip of the ball point pen.This hasn’t been seen yet: A typeface which truly looks as if it were handwritten.Calligraphy is, actually, the art of fine writing. And actually, written scripts as typeface for the computer are 100% nonsense. And yet, an obvious thought: Create a typeface which truly derives from everyday handwriting. And since we, if we write at all, utilize practically only a ball point pen anymore, then a modern cursive writing form must look like just that. As a counterpart to the artistic ”handwritings“ which have long been available as typeface, the thought of digitalizing a truly ”ugly“ handwriting is appealing. After all, time and again there is the need for a text to look ”handwritten“.Biró Script is written freehand with a ball point pen. Finally a truly individual script!Biró Script includes more than 300 authentic ligatures in addition to the customary alphabet.By the way, the most convincing effect is obtained with a font size of about 18 to 22 points, at which the thickness of the stroke is now about the same as that of a real ball point pen.There's a difference between the anglo-american forms of some characters (esp. the numerals 1 and 7, but also capitals I and F) and how it's written in the rest of the world. For those of us who aren’t used to the world-wide usual forms, Biró Script includes a US version with the appropriate characters.

  12. FF Real Text by FontFont 49.00 USD
    FF Real is a convincing re-interpretation of the German grotesque style from between 1998 and 1908, but with much more warmth and improved legibility as well as a hint towards the warmer American grotesques. Later on, not just slanted styles, but a “proper” italic version was added inspired by the way Roman and Italic are distinguished in traditional serif faces.NEW: a specially created set of obliques were added in 2018 to give designers more design flexibility, for those looking for a less calligraphic look.In 2020 the family was extended with matching condensed weights.FF Real was originally conceived by Erik Spiekermann as one text weight and one headline weight to be used as the only faces in his biography ‘Hello I am Erik’, edited by Johannes Erler, published in 2014. While Spiekermann drew the alphabets, he passed on the font data to Ralph du Carrois and Anja Meiners who cleaned it up and completed it. In the meantime, FF Real has been extended to a family of two styles and 65 weights each.The design of FF Real is rooted in early static grotesques from the turn of the century. Several German type foundries – among them the Berlin-based foundries Theinhardt and H. Berthold AG – released such designs between 1898 and 1908. The semi-bold weight of a poster-size typeface that was lighter than most of the according semi-bolds in metal type at the time, gave the impetus to FF Real’s regular weight. In the words of Spiekermann, the historical example is “the real, non-fake version, as it were, the royal sans serif face“, thus giving his new typeface the name “Real” (which is also in keeping with his four-letter names, i.e. FF Meta, FF Unit).FF Real is a convincing re-interpretation of the German grotesque style, but with much more warmth and improved legibility. With a hint towards the warmer American grotesques, Spiekermann added those typical Anglo-American features such as a three-story ‘g’ and an ‘8’ with a more defined loop. To better distinguish characters in small text sizes, FF Real Text comes in old style figures, ‘f’ and ‘t’ are wider, the capital ‘I’ is equipped with serifs, as is the lowercase ‘l’. What’s more, i-dots and all punctuation are round.

  13. FF Real Head by FontFont 49.00 USD
    FF Real is a convincing re-interpretation of the German grotesque style from between 1998 and 1908, but with much more warmth and improved legibility as well as a hint towards the warmer American grotesques. Later on, not just slanted styles, but a “proper” italic version was added inspired by the way Roman and Italic are distinguished in traditional serif faces.NEW: a specially created set of obliques were added in 2018 to give designers more design flexibility, for those looking for a less calligraphic look.In 2020 the family was extended with matching condensed weights.FF Real was originally conceived by Erik Spiekermann as one text weight and one headline weight to be used as the only faces in his biography ‘Hello I am Erik’, edited by Johannes Erler, published in 2014. While Spiekermann drew the alphabets, he passed on the font data to Ralph du Carrois and Anja Meiners who cleaned it up and completed it. In the meantime, FF Real has been extended to a family of two styles and 65 weights each.The design of FF Real is rooted in early static grotesques from the turn of the century. Several German type foundries – among them the Berlin-based foundries Theinhardt and H. Berthold AG – released such designs between 1898 and 1908. The semi-bold weight of a poster-size typeface that was lighter than most of the according semi-bolds in metal type at the time, gave the impetus to FF Real’s regular weight. In the words of Spiekermann, the historical example is “the real, non-fake version, as it were, the royal sans serif face“, thus giving his new typeface the name “Real” (which is also in keeping with his four-letter names, i.e. FF Meta, FF Unit).FF Real is a convincing re-interpretation of the German grotesque style, but with much more warmth and improved legibility. With a hint towards the warmer American grotesques, Spiekermann added those typical Anglo-American features such as a three-story ‘g’ and an ‘8’ with a more defined loop. To better distinguish characters in small text sizes, FF Real Text comes in old style figures, ‘f’ and ‘t’ are wider, the capital ‘I’ is equipped with serifs, as is the lowercase ‘l’. What’s more, i-dots and all punctuation are round.

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