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    What is this script font of 60s?
    gusrejc1989
    Aug 21st, 2010 / quote / 200.100.*.6*
    Hello people!

    I watched the film "Hairspray" and that script font called me the attention. See this script font of 60s:

    1) Pay attention in that old blue box "eange spray":
    http://images.allmoviephoto.com/2007_Hairspray/2007_hairspray_052.jpg

    2) Pay attention to that orange box "ny Collins":

    Thank you!

    Gustavo
    gusrejc1989
    Aug 21st, 2010 / quote / 200.100.*.6*
    Hey, see too:

    3) See the old blue box "Miss Teenage Hairspray":
    site moderator koeiekat
    Aug 21st, 2010 / quote / 81.35.*.1*
    On your first image:
    Firefox has detected that the server is redirecting the request for this address in a way that will never complete.

    Maybe IE can open it, but who is so insane to use IE?

    gusrejc, look at the brief tutorial above the reply box to learn how to make an image visible:
    http://www.abstractfonts.com/forum/?gid=11093
    site moderator koeiekat
    Aug 21st, 2010 / quote / 81.35.*.1*
    Can't find an exact match - that could take hours if it is digitized at all - but NovelFonts! once had the Jacquard which is reasonably close.
    site moderator koeiekat
    Aug 21st, 2010 / quote / 81.35.*.1*
    Maybe the Honey Script is also close enough?

    The original font as used on your picts is a Filmotype font named Jackson from the times of photosetting.
    gusrejc1989
    Aug 21st, 2010 / quote / 200.100.*.6*
    uploaded image
    Hello Cat!

    I analysed the three fonts : Filmotype Honey (Filmotype Jackson doesn't exist), Honey Script and Jacquard:

    1) Filmotype Honey: 90% closed because the letters M, T and g aren't closed.
    2) Honey Script: 98% closed but the the syllabe 'pray' isn't closed, but with kerning, it's almost closed.
    3) Jacquard: 98% closed but the syllabes "iss" and "pray" aren't closed, when with kerning, are almost a bit closed.

    Then they're Honey Script and Jacquard. They're my favourite fonts. I like them. Thank you, Cat! :-)

    Let's twist again! (lol)
    site moderator koeiekat
    Aug 21st, 2010 / quote / 81.35.*.1*
    Filmotype Jackson does exist but only for photosetting, a typesetting technique not used anymore. That was the one you see on the images.
    The closest one available in digital format (what they call a font nowadays) is NovelFonts! Jacquard.
    Honey Script is a variation on the OPTIJackson which is (was, not available anymore) a backslanted variation on the Filmotype Jackson.
    I know that the Jacquard is not an exact match, I said so before. Look at the r and s. But the g and y are much closer than the OPTIJackson and the Honey Script.
    None have a matching T.

    See, there is more to IDing a font than just mentioning a font-name.

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