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    dows anyone know therse fonts?
    tonibordallo
    Sep 18th, 2006 / quote / 201.51.*.1*
    uploaded image
    I´d like to know the fonts of "El orginal"

    and of this "Barrabrava" too..I mean, thats just like the everlast logo,so..it´s that.
    site moderator Heron2001
    Sep 18th, 2006 / quote / 64.203.*.1*
    BARRABRAV seems to be in the commercial font named Rockwell.
    http://www.myfonts.com/fonts/linotype/rockwell-mt-2/
    site moderator Heron2001
    Sep 18th, 2006 / quote / 64.203.*.1*
    tonibordallo
    Sep 19th, 2006 / quote / 201.51.*.2*
    but for doing this style in the name barrabrava,,lust like the Everlast logo, what resource on Corel or Photoshop they do? and this trace below??
    site moderator Heron2001
    Sep 19th, 2006 / quote / 64.203.*.1*
    Toni,

    The line below use to be down in a way called Handlettering with French Curves, Rapidograph pens, steady hands and a lot of time and effort.

    To achieve this same effect today, most can use a program called Adobe Illustrator - outline the type and pull, stretch, add, take away points till they get the desired effect.

    Corel and Photoshop are paint programs -- Illustrator is just what it says it is - illustration. And it comes with wonderful filters - including perspectives - like above.
    site moderator alex
    Sep 19th, 2006 / quote / 24.141.*.1*
    to be fair, nowdays, Photoshop contains plenty of vector-oriented operations that you can, in fact, easily create the above image using Photoshop only.

    And yes, the line under the word could just be a rectangle that the designer put under the text. Grouped the text with the rectangle and transformed the group. Once you have the shape, flatten it and then... stroke it...
    site moderator Heron2001
    Sep 19th, 2006 / quote / 64.203.*.1*
    Alex -
    You may be able to achieve a closeness in Photoshop - but it will never have the crispness of the lines you would have in Illustrator...

    Okay for web use I guess - but a definite NO-NO (yes in capital letters) for printed matter.
    site moderator alex
    Sep 19th, 2006 / quote / 24.141.*.1*
    i will disagree. i have worked with printed magazines. as long as your shapes in photoshop are in vector format and not rasterized, you can save that file at any DPI, set it to 300, 600, etc. You have the same output "crispiness" flexibility as in illustrator. Let me say that again, the vector shapes in photoshop are as crisp as the lines in illustrator.

    still, illustrator does have particular advantages and if you are VERY VERY HARDCORE (yes in capital letters) you might have to get illustrator on top of photoshop
    site moderator Heron2001
    Sep 19th, 2006 / quote / 64.203.*.1*
    Alex

    You may disagree with me all you like - it is the typographer in me coming out - wanting extremely sharp edges...

    As I have watched Photoshop get much better with their anti-aliasing -- it is still not where I personally would like it to be...

    Besides - do you know how many people do not know how to spell - and even after approval you need to reset...

    And yes, I can save layers upon layers and use up valuable space - but why - I don't need to improvise... I have the program that does the job correctly - the first time.
    site moderator koeiekat
    Sep 19th, 2006 / quote / 213.169.*.9*
    Ehhh ... and about the Rockwell ... close but no sigar yet. Not that this is of much help because I did not find a real match.



    Then, on the Paintshop/Illutsrator dispute, just for the record, Corel Draw was and is a drawing program. Ergo vector based. Remember the times that Adobe was nothing more that a company that did the PDF? Remember the times that Adobe bought Aldus and renamed Photo Styler as Photoshop and quadripled the price? Yet, after all these years the user interface is still almost the same. As, as it seems to me, the basic engine. But then what do I know, I am just the Kat. Those were the days of the war between Freehand and Corel Draw, when there was no Illustrator. So let's not confuse Draw with (Photo)Paint - which I figure will soon be replaced by PSP.
    site moderator Heron2001
    Sep 19th, 2006 / quote / 64.203.*.1*
    Kat

    Adobe had Photoshop before 1988 out... I remember and still have a receipt for one I purchased in 1987. I think you will find that is way before Photo Styler was out on the market.

    When Adobe bought Aldus - the problems came about because of Freehand vs Illlustrator. Aldus didn't really own Freehand - and the folks that did - did not want Adobe to bury it and promote only illustrator. It was designed by the same folks who brought us Fontographer!!!

    Corel Draw on the other hand was a program developed for IBM and IBM compatibles - and sorry to tell you this - for play - not for professionals.

    Adobe spent most of its time in research and developement of the MAC - using many funds from the US government.

    If you really want to turn back the clock - you have to look back at the early 1980s and LISA from Apple. The Army was aware that the personnel of the Army were not of the greatest minds and averaged out at a 5th grade education. Our government asked for help - a computer that was simple to use -- and that my dear little kitty kat was the start of Postscript...

    I'm nice enough to cats - time for you to be a sweetie to dogs... especially Bichons and Shih tzus.
    site moderator koeiekat
    Sep 19th, 2006 / quote / 213.169.*.9*
    This smells like an apple. The good thing is, I like apples. Yes Adobe had a program named Photoshop. It is after they changed the engine with the Aldus engine that it took off.
    Freehand is a totally different story. Smells like Adobe did not want it so it was sold to Macromedia, Yet, surprise, Adobe buys Macromedia (for flash?) - including Freehand - which makes the Freehand future insecure.

    About them doggies - doggies are fine. They run around trees while I'm watching them from above. It is just ... they eat anything ... (sorry Alex).
    site moderator Heron2001
    Sep 19th, 2006 / quote / 64.203.*.1*
    Adobe didn't sell it to Macromedia...

    Aldus was bought out by Adobe -- then Altsys took them both to court to get back their rights to Freehand.

    Altsys went bust - and their assets were picked up by Macromedia - and that included my beloved Fontographer...

    The guys at Altsys were great - I've missed them a lot over the years. Not bad for a group of Texans...
    site moderator koeiekat
    Sep 19th, 2006 / quote / 213.169.*.9*
    Sorry Heron. That is correct. Was too hasty.
    site moderator alex
    Sep 19th, 2006 / quote / 24.141.*.1*
    i will raise snobby dogs, just for you. their palette will be exquisite... :)
    site moderator koeiekat
    Sep 19th, 2006 / quote / 213.169.*.9*
    snobby? SNOBBY? S N O B BY ?
    site moderator alex
    Sep 19th, 2006 / quote / 24.141.*.1*
    in a good way
    agentart
    Sep 27th, 2006 / quote / 64.139.*.5*
    Sorry to butt in here, but Corel is actually a fairly decent draw program. This is coming from a hardcore Illustrator user too.

    The distortion on the example posted can be done in Corel quite easily. Using the Envelope tool, it doesn't need to be Converted to Curves, just select it, select the Envelope tool, select the Putty setting for the tool and arc it as necessary.

    And to be honest, Corel has become an industry standard software for graphic design for screenprinting, and for alot of sign shops. Part of the reason for this is it's versatility and ease of use. The other part comes from the fact that it has been used by alot of people at home, and they can give art to printers without going through a design house.

    I use it at my current job, because that's what they had used for years.

    I will admit though, for the really tough stuff I use Illustrator (which I have on my laptop for just such occasions), it simply can't be beaten.

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