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    script font connected across words
    mbrinkma
    Jan 5th, 2010 / quote / 67.191.*.5*
    Does anyone know of a handwriting-like script font that connects between adjacent words? I know this sounds strange but I'm creating patterns for a scroll saw and having the words connected together would help. Thanks!
    site moderator koeiekat
    Jan 5th, 2010 / quote / 80.39.*.2*
    Handwriting, no. But try the Velocette and use the underscore for the spaces. A bit of negative kerning will fill the last little gaps.
    mbrinkma
    Jan 5th, 2010 / quote / 67.191.*.5*
    Thanks for your replies. I had looked through all the calligraphy fonts here and didn't see any that connected between words, but it's always possible I missed one as well. I appreciate the help.
    site moderator koeiekat
    Jan 6th, 2010 / quote / 80.39.*.2*
    Also no handwriting, but try the A La Nage. For your job you're probably best of with the bold version.
    mbrinkma
    Jan 6th, 2010 / quote / 67.191.*.5*
    uploaded image
    Thanks, that will definitely work for some applications as well.

    I am using one of the Calli fonts from here (with separated words) for my current design.

    For some designs, having everything connected adds strength to the end product (and may even be required to make it possible). See the image for the effect I'm searching for.
    site moderator koeiekat
    Jan 7th, 2010 / quote / 193.152.*.7*
    The font used in your example is the Grandam which has been cloned as Arizona and GE Arabesque. The Grandam, 1994, far before open type and alternate beginnings and endings, has been manipulated to achieve the effect of connecting the words.

    What you want is not readily available I'm afraid.
    mbrinkma
    Jan 8th, 2010 / quote / 67.191.*.5*
    Okay, thanks. This is getting a little off-topic, but how much work is involved with modifying a font to do something like this; and are there decent tools that are free/cheap that can be used to do that?

    I don't necessarily want to become a font developer by trade but rather develop the tools to let me play elsewhere.

    I've done a little reading on TrueType fonts and it looks it could be fun to mess around with, although perhaps a bit tedious for those not doing it often. I suspect the right font editing program would make all the difference.
    site moderator koeiekat
    Jan 8th, 2010 / quote / 83.54.*.2*
    Are you on Windows or Mac?
    mbrinkma
    Jan 8th, 2010 / quote / 67.191.*.5*
    Windoze XP
    site moderator koeiekat
    Jan 8th, 2010 / quote / 83.54.*.2*
    Goto high-logic.com and download the trial of fontcreator. Fully functional for 30 days.
    mbrinkma
    Jan 10th, 2010 / quote / 67.191.*.5*
    I'll check it out, thanks.
    Savvy Poet
    Mar 14th, 2010 / quote / 174.98.*.4*
    uploaded image
    mbrinkma,
    If you have a vector graphics application like CorelDraw or Adobe Illustrator, you might try editing the font on an as needed basis.

    When you type a letter in CorelDraw, you can see that the letter is made up of an outline with lots of points (like a dot-to-dot game. If you drag specific points you can distort the font... and in your case, elongate the ending strokes of each word.

    I attached an example that I did just now with a simple Brush Script font. It took me about 2 minutes...but I've been using CorelDraw for over 15 years.

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